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Crafting with Corona VIII – The Family Hat Collection

I love a hat. Any hat. But a beanie really tugs at my heart strings. There are few things as nice as a beanie on a cold and miserable day. And with this collection, everybody is sure to stay warm!

My husband and son also love their beanies in winter. But to both of them, a beanie is not a fashion item. They couldn’t care for slouchy hats. They pull the hat all the way down onto their heads, and fold it over if it is too long. No stitch pattern other than ribbing works for these two men in my life. At least, when they fold ribbing over, it doesn’t look bad! This little beanie is so easy to knit, and the crown decreases result in a gorgeous design!

Being a grandmother, I decided to extend this pattern to accommodate the grandkids as well. They grow so fast. At least with a stretchy, fold-over hat, they will be able to wear it much longer! So here is The Family Hat Collection! You have four sizes to choose from: (adult xl / adult / small child / baby).

The adult xl is really big – it is for a BIG man with a BIG head. Most men will be fine with the adult size knitted on 4.5mm needles.

Requirements

  • Double Knit Yarn (±200m/100g)
    • Adult xl: 150g
    • Adult / small child: 100g
    • Baby 50g
  • 4.0mm circular knitting pins long enough to magic loop

Skill Level:

Easy

Abbreviations:

  • af – as facing – If your next st is a knit stitch (V visible), knit it; if your next st is a purl st (horizontal bar visible), purl it.
  • k – knit
  • m – marker
  • p – purl
  • p2tog – purl two together
  • pm – place marker
  • sm – slip marker
  • st – stitch (sts)

Special Stitch Patterns

Double Rib

(p2, k2) repeat to end of round

Pattern

Cast on (128 / 112 / 96 / 80) sts.

Place a sm to mark the start and end of each round.

Join to knit in the round in whichever method you prefer.

Starting with purl, knit in double rib until your work is (23 / 21 / 18 / 16) cm from the cast-on edge – (9 / 8 / 7 / 6 inches) if you want a fold-over. If you don’t like the fold-over, knit in double rib until your work is (18 / 16 / 14 / 13) cm from the cast-on edge – (7 / 6 / 5 / 4) inches.

From there…

Row 1:  
Do one more row of double rib, placing a m after every 16 sts. You should have (8 / 7 / 6 / 5) groups of 16 sts each.

Row 2:  
(p1, p2tog, af to m, sm) across the round.

Repeat row 2 until you have 4 sts left in each section.

From there:

(p2tog, k2togbl, rm) across the row

Cut a long tail, and use a wool needle to thread the tail TWICE through all the stitches, before removing your needles.

Once removed, pull the ring tight, and weave the end tail away on the INSIDE of the hat. The starting tail should be woven away on the outside of the hat, no higher than 2cm, if made to fold over. If not made to fold over, weave the tail away on the inside.

My patterns are free of charge and free of copyright. If you made and enjoyed this pattern, please consider a small donation via Paypal to hildasteyn@me.com, or use the donate button on the right.

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Twisted Sash Hat – Crafting with Corona VII

I LOVE small projects that can be made with one hank of yarn. This one was particularly pleasant. The hat is knitted entirely in ribbing which make for a nice snug fit regardless of slight differences in head circumference. The sash is knitted by picking up stitches on the side of the hat. Afterwards it is twisted and secured with a button. It sits very nicely and comfortably. Even without the sash, this will be a winner.

If no model is available, a big bottle, upside down on top of my mannequin will have to do! This was my husband’s creativity when I couldn’t think of any way to photograph this nicely.

Requirements

  • 100 g Fingering weight yarn (±400 m / 100 g)
  • 3.5 mm circular knitting needles
  • 1 decorative button
  • wool needle

Abbreviations

  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • k2tog – knit two together
  • k2tog-bl – knit two together through the back loops
  • p2tog – purl two together
  • pm – place marker
  • rep – repeat
  • slk – slip the next stitch knit-wise

Pattern

Cast on 120 sts, join to knit in the round, use a marker to indicate the start and end of each round.

Rnd 1:       
*k1, p1, rep from * to end of round.

Repeat rnd 1, 49 times more – 50 rounds.

Rnd 51:     
*continue in single rib for 15 sts, pm, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 52:     
*k2tog-bl, continue in single rib up to m, p2tog, continue single rib up to m, rep from * to end of rnd

Repeat round 52 until you have 3 sts between two markers – 24 sts in total.

Cut a long tail. With a wool needles, thread the tail twice through all the stitches, pull it tight to close the opening and weave away the tail on the inside.

Twisted Sash:

Pick up stitches along on of the ribbing ladders, from row 10 up to row 39 – 30 stitches in total.

Row 1:
slk1, k until 1 st remains, p1

Repeat row 1 until the sash is 65 cm long. Then shape it as follows:

Row 1:
slk1, k2tog-bl, k until 3 sts remain, k2tog, p1

Repeat row 1 until you have only 4 sts left, cast off.

Twist the sash 5 times and secure it on top of the start of the sash with a decorative button.

Afrikaanse Weergawe

Klein projekte wat met een string jaarn gemaak kan word, is vir my heerlik. Ek het hierdie een besonder baie geniet. Die hoed word regdeur in rifsteek gebrei, wat help dat dit verskillende kopgroottes steeds gerieflik pas. Die band word gebrei deur steke langs die kant van die hoed op te tel. Draai dit dan soos ‘n koeksister en werk met die knoop vas. Dit sit lekker knus en gemaklik. Selfs sonder die band is hierdie hoed ‘n wenner.

Benodigdhede

  • 100 g sokkiejaarn (±400 m / 100 g)
  • 3.5 mm sirkelbreinaalde
  • 1 dekoratiewe knoop
  • wolnaald

Afkortings

  • r – regs
  • aw – aweregs
  • r2tes – regs 2 tesame
  • r2tes-al – regs 2 tesame deur die agterlusse
  • aw2tes – aweregs 2 tesame
  • her – herhaal
  • gl – glip die volgende steek asof jy dit regs sou brei
  • pm – plaas merker
  • rdte – rondte

Patroon

Stel 120 steke op en heg om in die rondte te brei. Gebruik ‘n steekmerker om die begin en einde van die rondte aan te dui.

Rdte 1:       
*r1, aw1, her van * tot einde.

Herhaal rondte 1 nog 49 keer – 50 rondtes.

Rdte 51:     
*Brei voort in enkelrib vir 15 ste, pm, her van * tot einde.

Rdte 52:
*r2tes, brei voort in enkelrib tot by m, aw2tes, brei voort in enkelrib tot by m, her van * tot einde.

Herhaal rondte 52 totdat jy 3 steke tussen 2 merkers het – 24 steke in totaal.

Knip ‘n lang stert. Ryg die stert twee keer deur al die steke, trek die gaatjie toe en werk die stert aan die binnekant weg.

Gedraaide band

Tel steke op teen een van die ‘leertjies’ van die rifsteek, vanaf ry 10 tot by ry 39 – 30 steke in totaal – sien foto bo.

Ry 1:
gl1, r tot 1 st oorbly, aw1

Herhaal ry 1 totdat die band 65 cm lank is. Vorm dan soos volg:

Ry 1:
gl1, r2tes-al, r tot 3 ste oorbly, r2tes, p1.

Herhaal ry 1 totdat daar vier steke oor is, heg af.

Draai die band vyf keer en gebruik die knoop om dit bo-op die begin van die band vas te werk.

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The Yarn Queen Hat – Crafting with Corona VI

The editor of the Afrikaans magazine I design for, requested a poofy hat. When I sent a photo of myself wearing the hat to my testers, one person said the hat looked like a crown. When I modelled the hat on Facebook in a life video, Heidi Wahl also said it looks like a crown and called me The Yarn Queen. So there is a hat that will make you feel like the yarn queen!

The lovely Patricia from Malawi.

Requirements

  • ± 400 m DK (±200 m / 100 g)
  • 4.00 mm crochet hook (use a smaller hook than usual to give the hat firmer shape)

Abbreviations

  • ch – chain stitch
  • dc – double crochet
  • foll – following
  • fpdc – front post double crochet
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • rep – repeat
  • rnd – round
  • sk – skip
  • ss – slip stitch
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • tdc – twisted double crochet (starting dc)
  • tog – together

Pattern

Start with a double magic loop. Crochet round 1 in the circle before closing.

Round 1:        
tdc 1, dc 14, ss in the tdc to close the round (= 15 sts).

Round 2:        
tdc 1, fpdc 1 around the same st, *dc 1, fpdc 1 around the same st, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 30 sts).

Round 3:        
tdc 1, dc 1 in the same st, fpdc 1, *dc 2 in foll st, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 45 sts).

Round 4:        
tdc 1, dc 1 in the same st, dc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 60 sts).

Round 5:        
tdc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 1, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 60 sts).

Round 6:        

tdc 1, dc 1 in the same st, fpdc 1, dc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 2 in foll st, fpdc 1, dc 1, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 75 sts).

Round 7:        
tdc 1, dc 1, fpdc 1, dc 2 in foll st, fpdc 1, *dc 2, fpdc 1, dc 2 in foll st, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 90 sts).

Round 8:        
tdc 1, dc 1 in the same st, dc 1, fpdc 1, dc 2, fpdc 1, *dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, dc 2, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 105 sts).

Round 9:        
tdc 1, dc 2, fpdc 1, dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 3, fpdc 1, dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 120 sts).

Round 10:      
tdc 1, dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 1, dc 2 in foll st, dc 1, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 150 sts).

Round 11:      
tdc 1, dc 1 in the same st, dc 3, fpdc 1, *dc 2 in foll st, dc 3, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in tdc to close the round (= 180 sts).

Round 12:      
tdc 1, dc 4, fpdc 1, *dc 5, fpdc 1, rep from * to end (= 180 sts).

Rrepeat round 12 three times, but ss in the stitch AFTER the tdc at the end of round 15.

Round 16:      
tdc 1, dc 3, fpdc 1, *sk 1, dc 4, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in the st AFTER the tdc to close the round (= 150 sts).

Round 17:      
tdc 1, dc 2, fpdc 1, *sk 1, dc 3, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in the st AFTER the tdc to close the round (= 120 sts).

Round 18:      
tdc 1, dc 1, fpdc 1, *sk 1, dc 2, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in the tdc to close the round (= 90 sts).

Round 19:      
tdc 1, dc 1, fpdc 1, *dc 2, fpdc 1, rep from * to end, ss in the tdc to close the round (= 90 sts).

Round 20:      
ch 1 (does not count as st), hdc 1 in the same st, hdc 1 in each st to end, ss in 1st hdc to close the round (= 90 sts).

Round 21:      
as round 20 (= 90 sts).

Try on the hat. If the bottom part fits well, leave out round 22. If the bottom part is too loose, crochet round 22.

Round 22:      
ch 1 (does not count as st), hdc 1 in the same st, hdc 3, hdc2tog, *hdc 4, hdc2tog, rep from * to end, ss in 1st hdc to close the round (= 75 sts).

Round 23:      
ch 1 (does not count as st), hdc 1 in the same st, hdc 1 in each st to end, e/off and close the rnd with an invisible join (= 75 sts).

Weave away all the tails and wear it like a queen!

My patterns are free of charge and free of copyright. If you made and enjoyed this pattern, please consider a small donation via Paypal to hildasteyn@me.com, or use the donate button on the right.

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One Hank Scarf – Crafting with Corona V

This is one for the knitters!

Go do some stash diving and take out 100g of the finest and best sock yarn you have. Why? Because you are worth it, and you deserve it. If this doesn’t make sense to you, read this blog before you continue.

If you want to make a shawl, you will need 200-300 gram depending on the size you want. Simply continue until you have the desired size before you cast off.

Requirements

  • 100 g fingering (200-300 g if you want to make a shawl)
  • 4 mm circular needles
  • 5.5 mm circular needles

Abbreviations

  • inc – increase
  • k – knit
  • kfb – knit into the front and the back of the next stitch (increase)
  • k2tog – knit the next two stitches together
  • p – purl
  • rs – right side
  • slk – slip the next stitch knit-wise
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • ws – wrong side

Pattern

Using the 4mm needles, cast on 12 sts using any cast on method. Continue to knit with the same needles.

Row 1 (ws):     kfb, (yo, k1) x8 times, kfb, k1, p1 (22 sts)

Row 2 (rs) and every alternate row: slk1, knit to end

Row 3: kfb, (yo, k2tog) x8 times, kfb, k1, k2tog, p1 (23 sts)

Row 4: as row 2.

Row 5: kfb, (yo, k2tog) x8 times, kfb, k till 3 sts remain, k2tog, p1 (1 st inc)

Repeat rows 4-5 until you only have enough yarn to cast off. Use a 5.5mm needle to ensure a loose cast off.

My patterns are free of charge and free of copyright. If you made and enjoyed this pattern, please consider a small donation via Paypal to hildasteyn@me.com, or use the donate button on the right.

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The Serious Slouch – Crafting with Corona IV

Let’s have some fun! Let’s crochet some beanies.

Yesterday while working on my husband’s jacket, I suddenly thought of a matching beanie. And as always, I HAVE TO MAKE IT NOW! It can’t wait. It will drive me insane if I don’t make it. So make it with me!

And while we are at it, I will share some inside information with you to make your life easier.

Now I have to warn you; I did not name this The Serious Slouch for no reason. It is a SERIOUS slouch! If you don’t like such a massive slouch, make the bottom part of the hat shorter than the pattern specifies.

Size

Here is a table I have drawn up. This is a guideline only, but will save you loads of time in future. Measure the head circumference of the person who will wear the beanie; measure just above the ears and over the forehead. This measurement will give you a good indication of the size you need to make. Head circumference is a much better starting point than age, as people differ greatly.

Project Information

  • The beanie is crocheted top down. Due the construction though, there will be a partial seam.
  • Yarn that has some elasticity is a better choice than yarn with no elasticity. Merino is thus a better choice than cotton. Acrylic is normally elastic, but acrylic does not breathe and will cause itching. In my opinion, acrylic is a bad choice for a beanie, especially if the recipient doesn’t have a lot of hair. Acrylic is the worst choice for cancer beanies by the way.

Requirements

  • Yarn suitable for a beanie. You can use any yarn weight. I used 200g African Expressions Harmony (87m / 50g).
  • Crochet hook suitable for the yarn you are going to use. I used a 4.5mm hook.
  • Stitch marker

Abbreviations (US terms)

  • ch – chain
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • m – marker
  • nxt – next
  • pm – place marker in st last made
  • rnd – round
  • sc – single crochet
  • ss – slip-stitch
  • st – stitch

Pattern

Start with a double magic loop and crochet round 1 into the loop before closing it.

Round 1:
sc1, hdc8, do not close the round; we are now going to work in a spiral.

Round 2:
hdc2 in the sc from rnd 1, pm in the 1st hdc made to indicate start and end of each rnd, *hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

From here on:
No instructions will be given for your marker. When you reach it, remove it, crochet the new stitch and place the marker in the new stitch.
Work in the 3rd loop continuously until the crown is done.

Round 3:
*hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Round 4:
*(hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st) twice, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Round 5:
*(hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st) x3 times, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Round 6:
*(hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st) x4 times, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Round 7:
*(hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st) x5 times, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Round 8:
*(hdc1 in 3rd loop of next st) x6 times, hdc2 in 3rd loop of next st, rep from * to end of rnd.

Carry on in this fashion, increasing the bit between brackets with each round, until your crown = the required crown measurement in the table above.

Then:
Crochet one round with hdc1 in the 3rd loop of each st until 3 sts of the round remain, sc1 in each of the last 3 sts, then, (ss to the next st) x3 times.

Change to a bigger hook just for the chain. Fold the crown double and chain until the length from the start to the end of te chain is one and a half times the hat height specified in the table. I am making the Adult Large with hat height of 20cm. My measurement from the start of the crown to the end of the chain is 30cm (20×1.5). Switch back to the smaller hook.

Decide how broad you want the ribbing to be. For an adult I recommend about 3-4 cm. Measure your chain to see how many stitches that would be.

Start in the second chain from the hook and crochet 1 sc in each chain until you have the desired length of the ribbing, Place a marker in the last sc.

Continue up the chain with 1 hdc in each st until you reach the top. ss to the next st on the crown twice, turn.

Row 1:
Skip both slip-stitches, 1 hdc in each st up to m, rm, sc-bl1, pm, sc-bl1 in each st until 1 st remains, sc1 in the last st (both loops), turn.

Row 2:
ch1 (does not count as st), sc1 in the 1st st (both loops), sc-bl1 in each st up to an including st with m, pm, 1hdc-bl in each st up to top, ss to the next st on the crown twice, turn.

Repeat rows 1-2 around the crown of the hat. Keep an eye on the number of stitches left towards the end. If you do an upward row and there are 2 sts left, ss in both and go back down. End off at the edge. If you do an upward row and there is only 1 st left, ss in that last st and end off. Sew the seam on the inside. You can also use the loop join method in the very last row to avoid the seam.

I hope you enjoy this pattern! Remember to show off your hats in the Ilona Slow Life Creations Group on Facebook. If you share your hat on social media, please include #theseriousslouch.

All my patterns are free of charge and free of copyright. Please support me through a donation via Paypal (button on the right), or become a Patron on my Patreon page (button on the right); this will only cost you $2 per month. All donations go towards the purchasing of new yarn, for more amazing and free patterns.

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Shawl for Rachel – Crafting with Corona III

Covid-19 has changed our world overnight. The result in my house is a lack of yarn to design with! Imagine that! Sure I have stash, but the stuff in my stash is not exactly suitable for projects that will feature in South African magazines, as the yarn is either not readily available in South Africa, or, not available at all, or way too expensive for the average crafter. Regardless of all the reasons why not to use the yarn, I have no other option! To make matters worse, I normally only buy 1 or two hanks, which means my projects will have to smallish for a while.

Well, I had to design a shawl. The yarn I wanted to use for the shawl didn’t make it to me before the lock down started. Luckily one of my testers had enough yarn. I decided to write the pattern only. Unfortunately, right now, my concentration levels are just not on par. I have good days and I have bad days, just like everybody else. But even on good days, I battle. So my math was off and the testers battled to test. I decided to join them and went to my stash to find something that could work. Pfffffft. What a mission.

The only yarn I had that could possibly work, was Pierrot Fancy Yarns, a gift from a special friend. This yarn is manufactured in Japan and it isn’t available in South Africa as far as I know. It is a mix between linen and rami (stinging nettle).

When I started working it up, I really didn’t like it. It feels like twine and it is splitty. You can actually see both those characteristics just be looking at the photo! But boy oh boy – the perseverance was so worth it. Just look at this drape!

Unfortunately, I cannot share this pattern with you as it will be published in a magazine once the lock down has been lifted. As this point in time I choose to see it that way. Right now I don’t want to focus on all the what-ifs and what-nots. I choose to think normality will come again. Eventually.

Stay positive. Please stay positive. And stick to the rules and regulations in place where you are. That is the most important.

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The Lace-Lace Cowl – Crafting with Corona II

This blog is part of a series. If you haven’t yet read the previous one, please do so.

On Monday, I had a melt-down. I was crying, screaming and swearing for a day. Eventually my husband got me calmed down. It was then that I decided that I had to stay positive. Instead of falling victim to fear again, I started focussing on staying positive and living with gratitude, cause let’s face it, there are people far worse off than most of us.

Several people I spoke to had the same. A massive melt-down, lots of tears, and after that they too felt better. So if that is what it takes to get you to survive this lock-down, go right ahead and have your melt-down. Cry it all out. When you are done, wash your face and regain your focus. You can.

As with my previous Crafting with Corona project, I used my special yarns. This is Fluffy Mink from Prince Yarns, a 70% Longhaired Mink and 30% Angora blend. It was initially somewhat scared of the long hairs as it seemed to be guard hairs. I was worried for no reason. The cowl is so soft!

This is a gift for my youngest daughter. She loves scarfs in all shapes and sizes.

Well, you can join me. Go and grab some special yarn.

Requirements

  • 50g light fingering yarn (±600m / 100g)
  • 4mm circular knitting pins with a short cable
  • 4.5mm knitting pins
  • 4.5 mm crochet hook
  • 5 mm knitting pin

Abbreviations

  • k – knit
  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together
  • p – purl
  • rep – repeat
  • st – stitch
  • yo – yarn over

Pattern

Using the 4.5 mm knitting pins and crochet hook, cast on 120 sts with the crochet cast on method. Switch to the 4mm knitting pins and join to knit in the round. Place a marker to indicate the start/end of the round.

Row 1: knit

Row 2: purl

Row 3: knit

Row 4: purl

Row 5: *yo, k2tog, rep from * to end

Row 6: knit

Row 7: purl

Row 8: knit

Repeats rows 5-8 until the cowl is long enough. I recommend about 30cm. End on row 8.

Last row: purl

Use the 5mm knitting pin and cast off using your favourite cast off method.

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The Therapeutic Shawl – Crafting with Corona I

Corona. Covid-19. Words that suddenly fill every screen, every news bulletin, every newspaper, every magazine. Our world has changed so much in a few weeks. I have never been a fearful person, but this thing is messing with my mind. I am one of those with compromised immunity. I stay in my house. But my husband has to work. He mingles daily with people who make use of public transport. This morning I realised, no matter what I do and how much I stress, it won’t make a difference. The chance that I will contract this virus is big. I might as well come to terms with it.

Yesterday I simply could not concentrate on a difficult design I am working on. Eventually I just gave up. My concentration is horrid at this point in time. So I decided it is time for some meditative crochet. And you know what? I went to my stash and took out some of the most expensive and the most special yarns I have. Why not? Let me be honest about my reasoning. If I die because of this virus, I would have missed the opportunity to work with this yarn. I would have missed the opportunity to wear a garment made with this amazing yarn. So why leave it in the stash? For when? For who? For what? It doesn’t make sense any more. Yes I know I can die right now of a heart attack or whatever. We all know that but we don’t think about it daily. Corona forced us to think a bit more about death being inevitable. Who knows when and how it will come? I don’t. So stuff this. I will use my special yarns right now. I am not even looking for some fancy pattern that I previously would have thought to be worthy of this yarn. No. I am doing a granny shawl. Simple. Meditative. Therapeutic. The border will however be elaborate to finish it off. But I will worry about the border when I get there. For now, I am just enjoying the yarn.

I bought all of these a year ago when we visited our oldest daughter in New Zealand. For a year my poor yarns have been in lock down! Think about that!

Here is my challenge to you: Do some stash diving. Take out the most special yarn you have and join me. Crochet a granny meditative shawl for yourself. This shawl is triangular, worked around the corner and can be as big as you want it to be. Mine will be massive. I want to be able to wrap it around and give myself ‘n hug on a bad day. The border will be fancy, but that will only be posted next week.

Light Grey: Touch Possum Yarn (60% Merino, 30% Possum Fur, 10% Silk)
Dark Grey and Black: Naturally Amuri (75% Merino, 25% Possum)
Cerise: Misti Alpaca (50% Alpaca, 30% Merino, 10% Silk, 10% Nylon)

Pattern

Please note: this pattern has not been tested yet. If you use it, please post any errors you may find in the comments below. Your help is much appreciated.

Abbreviations (US terms)

  • 3dc-c – double crochet corner (dc3, ch2, dc3) in one st or sp
  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • sk – skip
  • sp – space
  • tr – treble

Start with a double magic loop and crochet round 1 into the loop before closing it.

Row 1:    
ch5, dc3-c, ch1, tr: 1 granny cluster on a side

Row 2:    
ch5, dc3 in the side ch-space, ch1, sk3, dc3-c in the corner 2-ch-space, ch1, sk3, (dc3, ch1, tr) in the  side ch-space: 2 granny clusters on a side

Row 3:    
ch5, dc3 in the side ch-space, ch1, sk3, dc3 in the next ch-space, ch1, sk3, 3dc-c in the corner 2-ch-space, ch1, sk3, dc3 in the next ch-space, ch1, sk3, (dc3, ch1, tr) in the side ch-space: 3 granny clusters on a side

Row 4:    
ch5, dc3 in the side ch-space, (ch1, sk3, dc3 in the next ch-space) x2 times, ch1, sk3, 3dc-c in the corner 2-ch-space, (ch1, sk3, dc3 in the next ch-space) x2 times, ch1, sk3, (dc3, ch1, tr) in the side ch-space: 4 granny clusters on a side

Repeat row 4 until you have 70 clusters on a side. With each row, you will have one cluster more on each side. Combine yarns. Change colour when you feel like it. I am not prescribing when you should colour, that would imply looking at a pattern and counting – not at all what we need right now. Just cruise. Don’t think about it. Just enjoy it.

Edge

Row 1:
ch5, dc2 in the side ch-sp, *dc3, dc1 in next 1ch-sp, rep from * to 3 sts before cnr, dc3, (dc2, ch2, dc2) in cnr 2ch-sp, **dc3, dc1 in next 1ch-sp, rep from ** until you are in the side ch-sp, (dc1, ch1, tr1) in the side ch-sp, turn.

Row 2:
ch5, dc1 in the side ch-sp, ch1, dc1, *ch2, sk2, dc1, rep from * to 2 sts before cnr, sk2, (dc1, ch2, dc1) in cnr 2ch -sp, **ch2, sk2, dc1, rep from** to before side ch-sp, ch1, (dc1, ch1, tr1) all in side ch-sp, turn.

Row 3:
ch5, sc1 in the side ch-sp, *ch5, sc1 in the next 2ch-sp, rep from * into cnr 2ch-sp, ch5, sc1 in the same cnr 2ch-sp, **ch5, sc1 in the next 2ch-sp, rep from ** into side ch-sp, ch1, tr1 in the cnr ch-so, turn.

Row 4:
ch1, sc1 in side ch-sp, *dc7 in next 5ch-sp, sc1 in next 5ch-sp, ch5, sc1 in next 5ch-sp, rep from * to 5ch-sp before cnr, dc9 in cnr 5ch-sp, **sc1 in next 5ch-sp, ch5, sc1 in next 5ch-sp, dc7 in next 5ch-sp, rep from ** till only the side ch-sp remains, sc1 in side ch-sp, turn.

Row 5:
ch5, dc1 in 1st st, sk1, ch2, *(dc1, ch1) x4 times, dc1, ch2, sc1 in next 5ch-sp, ch2, sk2, rep from * into the last 5-ch-sp before cnr, (dc1, ch1) x6 times, dc1, **ch2, sk2, sc1 in next 5ch-sp, ch2, sk2, (dc1, ch1) x4 times, dc1, rep from ** to 2 sts before side ch-sp, ch2, sk1, (dc1, ch1, tr1) in side ch-sp, turn.

Row 6:
ch1, sc3 in side ch-sp, (sc2 in next ch-sp) twice, ch8, turn, ss in the 1st of the row, turn, (sc5, picot, sc5) all in the 8ch-sp, [(sc2 in next ch-sp) x6 times, ch8, turn, sk7, ss in next st, turn, (sc5, picot, sc5) all in 8ch-sp] x32 times, (sc1 in next ch-sp) x4 times, ch8, turn, sk5, ss in next st, turn, (sc5, picot, sc5) all in 8ch-sp, (sc2 in next ch-sp) x4 times, ch8, turn, sk5, ss in next st, turn, (sc5, picot, sc5) all in 8ch-sp, [(sc2 in next ch-sp) x6 times, ch8, turn, sk7, ss in next st, turn, (sc5, picot, sc5) all in 8ch-sp] x31 times, (sc2 in next ch-sp) x4 times, sc3 in side ch-sp, ch8, turn, sk5, ss in next st, turn (sc5, picot, sc5) in 8ch-sp, e/off.

Weave away all your tails. Block to open up the lace. Give yourself a yarny hug every time you wear it. It is gorgeous.

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Rainy Day Scarf

This little scarf is the perfect project for that lonely hank of yarn that you don’t know what to do with. And it is perfect for those rainy days when you want to craft, but you don’t feel like thinking and counting too much. It makes a quick gift for a special person too! This little pattern, is my go-to when I am tired of life and I just want to cuddle some yarn until I feel better. You really only need 100g of yarn. I prefer fingering weight, but I have done this in sport weight and lace weight too; just choose your needles according to your yarn. Don’t work too tight, then you won’t have nice drape – use needles suitable for a project that requires drape.

Requirements

  • 100g fingering weight yarn (±400m /100g)
  • 3.5mm knitting pins (circular is recommended)

Abbreviations

k – knit * k2tog – knit 2 together (decrease) * p – purl * slk – slip the next stitch knit-wise * st – stitch * yo – yarn over *

Pattern

  • Cast on 5 sts.
  • Row 1: slk1, k2, yo, k1, yo, p1 (7 sts)
  • Row 2: slk1, k till 1 st remains, p1
  • Row 3: slk1, k2, yo, k1, yo, k2, p1 (9 sts)
  • Row 4: as row 2
  • Row 5: slk1, k2, yo, k1, yo, k2, k2tog, p1
  • Row 6: as row 2
  • Row 7: slk1, k2, yo, k1, yo, k until 3 sts remain, k2tog, p1
  • Repeat rows 6 and 7 until you only have enough yarn to cast off.

How to wear

Place the widest part of the scarf in front.
Throw the ends over your shoulders, cross them at the back, and bring back to the front. You will see the one end hangs a lot lower than the other. Adjust the entire scarf now gently, to have the points hang at more or less the same height. Alternatively, secure the short end under the scarf and leave the long one to hang.

My patterns are free of charge and free of copyright. If you made and enjoyed this pattern, please consider a small donation via Paypal to hildasteyn@me.com, or use the donate button on the right.

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Design and crochet your own garments

My mother taught me to crochet and knit when I was four years old, however, she never taught me to read a pattern, nor did I ever see her knit or crochet from one. She had little books called the Harmony Guides, which contained only little stitch patterns; that is all we ever used. The design of each garment was our own.

As an adult crafter in the era of social media, I noticed the following two disadvantages of using patterns.

Yarn substitution

We are scattered all over the globe and what is readily available to me, isn’t readily available to the crafter in another country. Finding something with exactly the same fibre content and weight is sometimes so tedious that many people give up and never use the pattern they paid for.

Sometimes, the yarn the designer used is available but way out of budget for the crafter. He or she is left excluded from a beautiful pattern because of financial constraints. I find that so unfair.

The fit

Even though most patterns have different size options, it is still difficult to make a garment that really fits well. Our bodies differ so much; what works for me, won’t necessarily work for you. Add to that the cost and time involved in the design of a multi-size pattern; each size has to be tested and for that I have to find testers that fit the pattern sizes. Schlep and lots of it.

I think it is for this reason that many patterns exclude the petitie and the slightly bigger bodies, as if they don’t exist. I know that I shy away from publishing multi-size patterns. There are always unhappy crafters to whom the pattern sizes do not apply. Every time this happens, I feel so heartbroken. It feels as if I have personally let a crafter down.

Value for Money

Most people use a pattern only once. After all, who wants a closet full of garments all looking the same? Free patterns are sometimes (not always) riddled with mistakes as they were not properly tested. Paid patterns are seen as the better option, but is it really if you are only going to use it once? I don’t think so. A pattern that is easy to adapt, both to a different size and to a different stitch pattern, is more value for money in my opinion.

Do I have an answer to these issues? Yes, I do.

Design Your Own

In 2020 I will host a month long CAL each month, with a different design each time. The design won’t be given as a pattern, instead, it will be given as a method. A method that will allow you to use any yarn and make the garment for any size body, from baby right through to adult male if you so wish. Make it once and change it each time thereafter. Another type of yarn, another colour, another stitch pattern and voila! Something entirely different. Now that is value for money, don’t you think?

The project for each month will be added to the Design Your Own Gallery and it will be advertised on the Ilona Slow Life Creations Facebook Page. For 2020 I am focussing on tops – all of them. Closed jumpers, cardigans, jackets, coats etc. I will even throw in a unisex item or two. Different construction methods will be used in order to broaden your horizons.

To join:

  • Make a payment of $10 via Paypal to hildasteyn@me.com, or, use the Paypal button on the right. If you are based in South Africa, you can send an email to hildasteyn@me.com requesting banking details for a payment of R150.
  • Send proof of payment to me via email, stating which month you want to join and I will reply with the link to the relevant group on Facebook.
  • Each project will span over two months – the first month of the CAL and a second month to support those who are still busy. After the second month, the Facebook Group will be closed.
  • Payment is only for one project.
  • Special offer: If you want to do all 12 projects, even thought you haven’t seen them yet, you can make a payment for $90 for the entire year (25% discount). If you are based in South Africa that would amount to R1350.